Know Cancer

or
forgot password

Chemoprevention of Breast and Prostate Cancers in Shift Workers by Dietary Methylselenocysteine: Effects on Circadian Rhythm and Estrogen Receptor-B Cycling


N/A
21 Years
60 Years
Open (Enrolling)
Both
Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer

Thank you

Trial Information

Chemoprevention of Breast and Prostate Cancers in Shift Workers by Dietary Methylselenocysteine: Effects on Circadian Rhythm and Estrogen Receptor-B Cycling


All living cells have a circadian (daily) rhythm which controls a variety of bodily
functions that change throughout the day, including body temperature, sleep, hunger,
activity, hormone levels, etc. The circadian rhythm of the body is controlled by the amount
of light that enters our eyes, so on our planet the length of the rhythm is 24 hours long.
It is therefore reasonable to suspect that upsetting the timing of the rhythm would lead to
changes in body function (as commonly experienced in "jet lag") and that prolonged changes
might even lead to alterations in bodily functions and contribute to disease. This suggests
that people whose service to the community that requires that they often work at night
(nurses, doctors, police, hospital staff, firefighters, airline crews, factory workers,
etc), might be at elevated risk of developing diseases. Studies have shown that women who do
shift work have an elevated risk of breast cancer, probably as a result of altered hormone
levels and cycling. Other studies have shown that vitamin supplementation with a naturally
occurring dietary amino acid called organic selenium (i.e., methylselenocysteine) can
restore this disrupted rhythm and possibly decrease this disease risk. Thus, the purpose of
this study is to investigate whether taking daily selenium (i.e., methylselenocysteine) will
restore the disrupted circadian rhythm in shift workers.


Inclusion Criteria:



- Permanent night shift schedule

Exclusion Criteria:

- Nutritional supplements that contain selenium

- Pregnant

- Breast feeding

- Heart conditions

- Chronic lung disease

- Cancer therapy (current or past)

Type of Study:

Observational

Study Design:

Observational Model: Case Control, Time Perspective: Prospective

Outcome Measure:

Determine if selenium (i.e., methylselenocysteine) supplementation can restore disruption of circadian rhythm and estrogen receptor-B levels in shift workers

Outcome Time Frame:

30 days

Safety Issue:

No

Principal Investigator

Howard M. Kipen, MD, MPH

Investigator Role:

Principal Investigator

Investigator Affiliation:

University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey

Authority:

United States: Institutional Review Board

Study ID:

0220100243

NCT ID:

NCT01611038

Start Date:

October 2011

Completion Date:

December 2013

Related Keywords:

  • Breast Cancer
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Breast Neoplasms
  • Prostatic Neoplasms

Name

Location

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences InstitutePiscataway, New Jersey  08854