Know Cancer

or
forgot password

Cognitive Changes After Surgery in the Elderly: Does Minimally Invasive Surgery Influence the Incidence of Postoperative Cognitive Changes Compared to Open Colon Surgery?


N/A
65 Years
N/A
Open (Enrolling)
Both
Confusion, Inflammation, Acute Phase Reaction, Surgery, Delirium

Thank you

Trial Information

Cognitive Changes After Surgery in the Elderly: Does Minimally Invasive Surgery Influence the Incidence of Postoperative Cognitive Changes Compared to Open Colon Surgery?


Cognitive changes in the elderly are common after surgery. It is not known if minimally
invasive or laparoscopic surgery can prevent these changes. A study will be conducted on
patients scheduled to have abdominal surgery. The patients will have cognitive evaluations
before and after surgery. A small amount of blood, about 2 tablespoons, will be collected no
more than 5 times in 6 months. The results will be analyzed to determine if there are
changes between those having open surgery versus patients having laparoscopic or minimally
invasive surgery, and if these changes coincide with cognitive changes.


Inclusion Criteria:



- Patients over age 65.0 years and in need of elective colon resection for
adenocarcinoma

Exclusion Criteria:

- Inability to complete preoperative cognitive screening

- Inability to complete study in English since CANTAB is timed and not validated with
interpreters

- Emergency surgery

- Depression or psychiatric comorbidity

- Pre-existing dementia

- Previous cerebrovascular accident or "stroke"

- Previous myocardial infarction

- Cardiac ejection fraction below 55%

- Propranolol, metoprolol or other betablocker use

- Digoxin, procainamide, or amiodarone use

- Calcium channel blocker use

- History of vascular surgery or arterial vascular disease

- History of alcohol dependence

- Lovastatin or other HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor use

- Ace inhibitor use

- Neuroendocrine or catecholamine associated tumors

- Hypertension

- Diabetes

- Benzodiazepine use

- Dimenhydrinate or other medications to treat motion sickness

- Metaclopramide use

Type of Study:

Observational

Study Design:

Observational Model: Case Control, Time Perspective: Prospective

Outcome Measure:

Confusion

Outcome Description:

Confusion assessed by questionaires and cognitive testing

Outcome Time Frame:

6 Months

Safety Issue:

No

Principal Investigator

Mitchell I Chorost, MD

Investigator Role:

Principal Investigator

Investigator Affiliation:

New York Hospital Queens

Authority:

United States: Institutional Review Board

Study ID:

ECRIP

NCT ID:

NCT01623297

Start Date:

January 2012

Completion Date:

January 2015

Related Keywords:

  • Confusion
  • Inflammation
  • Acute Phase Reaction
  • Surgery
  • Delirium
  • Laparoscopy
  • Surgery
  • Acute Phase Reaction
  • Aged
  • Aged 80 and over
  • Confusion
  • Inflammation
  • Delirium
  • Acute-Phase Reaction
  • Confusion
  • Delirium
  • Inflammation

Name

Location

New York Hospital QueensFlushing, New York  11355