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Way to Quit - Comparative Efficacy, Acceptance and Effectiveness of Health Incentive Structures


N/A
18 Years
N/A
Open (Enrolling by invite only)
Both
Tobacco Use Disorder

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Trial Information

Way to Quit - Comparative Efficacy, Acceptance and Effectiveness of Health Incentive Structures


Specific Aim I: Compare the efficacy and effectiveness of 4 financial incentive structures
for improving "quit rates" (rates of prolonged smoking abstinence for 6 months): (a)
individual financial rewards, (b) individual deposit contracts, (c) cooperative rewards, and
(d) competitive deposit contracts

H1: Compared with usual care, all 4 incentive structures will increase quit rates
significantly.

H2: Compared with individual financial rewards of equivalent size and schedule, individual
deposit contracts, cooperative rewards, and competitive contracts will each increase quit
rates significantly.

H3: Group-oriented structures will increase quit rates significantly more than
individual-oriented structures.

Specific Aim II: Compare smokers' acceptance of these 4 financial incentive structures for
smoking cessation

H4: Uptake rates of reward-based structures will be higher than of structures involving
deposit contracts.

H5: Uptake rates of group-oriented structures will be higher than of individual-oriented
structures.

Specific Aim III: Identify individual characteristics that modify incentive structures'
efficacy and acceptance

H6: Incentives will promote relatively greater quit rates among participants with fewer
substitute reinforcers.

H7: Incentives will promote relatively greater quit rates among participants with lower
incomes.

H8: Higher-income persons will be relatively more likely to accept incentives requiring
deposit contracts.


Inclusion Criteria:



- Active smoker of 5 cigarettes per day for at least 6 months;

- At least 18 years old;

- Current full- or part-time employee of CVS or be a family member or friend of a
current full- or part-time employee of CVS.

Exclusion Criteria:

- Use a form of tobacco other than cigarettes while participating in the study (as this
may influence biochemical testing);

- Are unable or unwilling to access the internet;

- Are unable to provide informed consent.

- Due to the web-based nature of this study, people without reliable computer and
internet access will also be excluded.

Type of Study:

Interventional

Study Design:

Allocation: Randomized, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Double Blind (Investigator, Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose: Treatment

Outcome Measure:

Salivary cotinine or anabasine testing (metabolites of nicotine)

Outcome Description:

The primary measure of smoking cessation will be prolonged abstinence for 6 months, which will be measured by salivary cotinine testing or by urinary anabasine testing (for those participants using nicotine replacement therapy). Saliva samples will be analyzed using semi-quantitative immunochromatographic assay test strips at the University of Pennsylvania. Urine samples will be analyzed using gas chromatography at the Associated Regional and University Pathologists (ARUP) Lab, at the University of Utah.

Outcome Time Frame:

at 6 months following the patient selected target quit date.

Safety Issue:

No

Principal Investigator

Scott Halpern, MD, Ph.D.

Investigator Role:

Principal Investigator

Investigator Affiliation:

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care

Authority:

United States: Institutional Review Board

Study ID:

814761

NCT ID:

NCT01526265

Start Date:

February 2012

Completion Date:

November 2015

Related Keywords:

  • Tobacco Use Disorder
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Work-site
  • Incentives
  • Health Behavior
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco Use Disorder

Name

Location

University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania  19104