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Smoking Cessation Treatment for Head & Neck Cancer Patients: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy


N/A
18 Years
N/A
Open (Enrolling)
Both
Head and Neck Cancer, Smoking Cessation

Thank you

Trial Information

Smoking Cessation Treatment for Head & Neck Cancer Patients: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy


Part 1:

Counseling to Quit Smoking Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is designed to help patients
change the way they respond to feelings and thoughts that cause them to want to smoke. It
is also designed to help increase patients' ability to tolerate negative feelings about
cancer, and to increase patients' commitment to other goals that are related to what they
value in life.

Motivational and Behavioral Counseling is designed to help patients increase their
motivation to quit smoking. It is also designed to help patients develop skills and
behaviors that will help them cope with situations when they want to smoke.

Baseline Tests:

If you are found to be eligible to take part in the pilot study, you will have additional
"baseline" tests. This will include a series of questionnaires, which will take about 30
minutes to complete, and a saliva test. These tests will be done at the same visit as the
screening tests.

You will fill out 10 or 11 questionnaires that relate to:

- smoking

- any symptoms of nicotine dependence and withdrawal

- your feelings and thoughts in response to urges to smoke

- your confidence in your ability to quit smoking

- your reasons for quitting smoking

- your mood

- your use of alcohol

- the general quality of your life

- any effects of cancer on your ability to take part in everyday activities

- your response to stressful events in your life

Saliva will be collected to check for a chemical called cotinine. This test will help
researchers measure how much you are smoking. To collect saliva, a cotton swab will be
placed in your mouth for several minutes.

The information you provide in the Tobacco Treatment Program (TTP) questionnaires regarding
anxiety, depression, alcohol use, sleeping difficulties, smoking withdrawal symptoms,
nicotine dependence and smoking will be used for this study, so that you do not have to
fill out these questionnaires twice. Physical data that you provided to the TTP (such as
breath samples, blood pressure, heart rate and weight) will also be used in this study, so
that it does not have to be collected twice.

Study Groups:

You will be assigned to 1 of 2 groups. The group you are in will be decided based on the
study counselors' training schedules and other study needs.

- Group 1 will receive Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

- Group 2 will receive Motivational and Behavioral Counseling.

You will receive a booklet that describes the type of counseling you will receive.

Varenicline as Standard Care:

Participants in both groups will receive varenicline through the Tobacco Treatment Program.
Varenicline is designed to imitate the effects that nicotine has on the body. This may
reduce cigarette cravings and help people quit smoking.

As part of your counseling sessions, you will be counseled to help you make a plan to quit
smoking and to set a quit date. The quit date may be scheduled for about 3 weeks after your
screening/baseline visit.

You will be provided with a 10-week supply of varenicline. Your first dose will be at least
2 weeks before the quit date, and you will continue taking varenicline until 8 weeks after
the quit date. You will take it by mouth, 2 times a day.

Varenicline is the standard drug that is given in the Tobacco Treatment Program.

The Tobacco Treatment Program staff will discuss the risks of varenicline with you.

Counseling Visits:

You will have 6 visits with a study counselor during the 12 weeks after your
screening/baseline visit.

At every visit:

- You will receive counseling that will last about an hour.

- You will fill out 5-8 questionnaires about smoking, mood, alcohol use, quality of life,
and coping. This should take about 20-30 minutes.

- You will be asked about any changes in the drugs or other treatments you may be
receiving.

- You will be asked about how you took varenicline.

- You will be given homework assignments that will help you practice the skills that you
learn during the visits. There will be 1 or 2 homework assignments per week, and each
assignment will take about 30 minutes.

At your last counseling visit (Counseling Visit 6), you will be asked questions about how
satisfied you may be with the study counseling. Also at this visit, the research staff may
ask you to provide a saliva sample that will be used to measure if and how much you have
smoked.

If you do not complete all 6 of the counseling sessions, the research staff will call and
ask you what made it difficult for you to complete the counseling sessions.

Videotaping:

Each of the counseling visits will be videotaped. The videotapes will be used to help the
research staff make sure that the study counselors are following the correct therapy
procedures.

The videotapes will probably be saved for 2 years and then destroyed. However, it is
possible that these videotapes will be saved for a longer period of time.

Only the research staff, study counselors, and study consultants will be allowed to watch
the tapes. The study consultants will review the tapes and rate how well the study
counselors follow therapy procedures. One consultant is an associate professor at the
University of Mississippi. The other consultant is a research scientist at the University
of Texas. Another consultant is an assistant professor at University of Washington. All are
collaborators for this study and part of the research team.

Safety Procedures:

Quitting smoking may cause side effects affecting your mental and emotional health. For
your safety, the study counselor and study chair will be looking for any signs that you may
be having these side effects.

If the study counselor or study chair think that you may be having emotional difficulties or
depression, they may decide to recommend that you be treated for it.

If they believe you are at risk of being a danger to yourself, you will be contacted by the
study chair right away and if appropriate, you will be referred to meet with the Tobacco
Treatment Program psychiatrist (mental health doctor).

Follow-Up Visit:

You will have a follow-up visit at 3 months after your quit date. You will complete most of
the same questionnaires that you completed at the screening/baseline visit, and this should
take about 30 minutes. The research staff also may ask you to provide a saliva sample that
will be used to measure if and how much you have smoked.

Length of Study:

Your participation in this study will be over after your follow-up visit.

This is an investigational study. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is investigational, and
Motivational and Behavioral Counseling is standard.

Varenicline is FDA approved and commercially available to help people stop smoking.

Up to 108 patients will take part in this study. This includes 12 participants who are
interviewed before Part 1 opens, 20 participants in Part 1, and 76 participants in Part 2.
All will be enrolled at MD Anderson.

Part 2:

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is designed to help patients change the way they respond
to feelings and thoughts that cause them to want to smoke. It is also designed to help
increase patients' ability to tolerate negative feelings about cancer, and to increase
patients' commitment to other goals that are related to what they value in life.

Motivational and Behavioral Counseling is designed to help patients increase their
motivation to quit smoking. It is also designed to help patients develop skills and
behaviors that will help them cope with situations when they want to smoke.

Baseline Tests:

If you are found to be eligible to take part in this study, you will have additional
"baseline" tests. This will include a series of questionnaires, which will take about 30
minutes to complete, and a saliva test. These tests will be done at the same visit as the
screening tests.

You will fill out 10 or 11 questionnaires that relate to:

- smoking

- any symptoms of nicotine dependence and withdrawal

- your feelings and thoughts in response to urges to smoke

- your confidence in your ability to quit smoking

- your reasons for quitting smoking

- your mood

- your use of alcohol

- the general quality of your life

- any effects of cancer on your ability to take part in everyday activities

- your response to stressful events in your life

Saliva will be collected to check for a chemical called cotinine. This test will help
researchers measure how much you are smoking. To collect saliva, a cotton swab will be
placed in your mouth for several minutes.

The information you provide in the Tobacco Treatment Program (TTP) questionnaires regarding
anxiety, depression, alcohol use, sleeping difficulties, smoking withdrawal symptoms,
nicotine dependence and smoking will be used for this study, so that you do not have to fill
out these questionnaires twice. Physical data that you provided to the TTP (such as breath
samples, blood pressure, heart rate and weight) will also be used in this study, so that it
does not have to be collected twice. Some of the data you provide to this study regarding
mood, nicotine withdrawal, and smoking will be provided to the TTP so that it does not have
to be collected twice.

Study Groups:

You will be randomly assigned (as in the toss of a coin) to 1 of 2 groups. There is an
equal chance that you will be assigned to either group.

- Group 1 will receive Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

- Group 2 will receive Motivational and Behavioral Counseling.

You will receive a booklet that describes the type of counseling you will receive.

Varenicline as Standard Care:

Participants in both groups will receive varenicline through the Tobacco Treatment Program.

As part of your counseling sessions, you will be counseled to help you make a plan to quit
smoking and to set a quit date, if you so choose.

You will be provided with 10 weeks of medication. You will take it by mouth, up to 2 times a
day.

Varenicline is the standard drug that is given in the Tobacco Treatment Program. The
Tobacco Treatment Program staff will discuss the risks of varenicline with you.

Counseling Visits:

You will have 6 visits with a study counselor during the 12 weeks after your
screening/baseline visit.

At every visit:

- You will receive counseling that will last about an hour.

- You will fill out 5-8 questionnaires about smoking, mood, alcohol use, quality of life,
and coping. This should take about 20-30 minutes.

- You will be asked about any changes in the drugs or other treatments you may be
receiving.

- You will be asked about how you took varenicline.

- You will be given homework assignments that will help you practice the skills that you
learn during the visits. There will be 1 or 2 homework assignments per week, and each
assignment will take about 30 minutes.

At your last counseling visit (Counseling Visit 6), the research staff may ask you to
provide a saliva sample that will be used to measure if and how much you have smoked.

Videotaping:

Each of the counseling visits will be videotaped. The videotapes will be used to help the
research staff make sure that the study counselors are following the correct therapy
procedures.

The videotapes will probably be saved for 2 years and then destroyed. However, it is
possible that these videotapes will be saved for a longer period of time.

Only the research staff, study counselors, and study consultants will be allowed to watch
the tapes. The study consultants will review the tapes and rate how well the study
counselors follow therapy procedures. One consultant is an associate professor at the
University of Mississippi, one consultant is a research scientist at the University of
Texas, and the last consultant is an assistant professor at University of Washington. All
are collaborators for this study and part of the research team.

Safety Procedures:

Quitting smoking may cause side effects affecting your mental and emotional health. For
your safety, the study counselor and study chair will be looking for any signs that you may
be having these side effects.

If the study counselor or study chair think that you may be having emotional difficulties or
depression, they may decide to recommend that you be treated for it.

If they believe you are at risk of being a danger to yourself, you will be contacted by the
study chair right away and if appropriate, you will be referred to meet with the Tobacco
Treatment Program psychiatrist (mental health doctor).

Follow-Up Visits:

You will have follow-up visits at 3 and 6 months after your quit date. You will complete
most of the same questionnaires that you completed at the screening/baseline visit, and this
should take about 30 minutes. At these visits, the research staff may ask you to provide a
saliva sample that will be used to measure if and how much you have smoked.

Length of Study:

Your participation in this study will be over after your second follow-up visit.

This is an investigational study. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is investigational,
and Motivational and Behavioral Counseling is standard.

Varenicline is FDA approved and commercially available to help people stop smoking.

Up to 108 patients will take part in this study. This includes 12 participants who are
interviewed before Part 1 opens, 20 participants in Part 1, and 76 participants in Part 2.
All will be enrolled at MD Anderson.


Inclusion Criteria:



1. Current or history of head and neck, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, or genitourinary
cancer

2. Age 18 or older

3. Smoking 1 cigarette or more per day at screening visit

4. English speaking and have a telephone

5. Willing to provide informed consent and agree to all assessments and study procedures

6. Recommended for and agreed to treatment with varenicline through the Tobacco
Treatment Program

7. Plan to receive treatment for head and neck, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, or
genitourinary cancer, currently undergoing treatment, or in follow-up care at M.D.
Anderson Cancer Center

Exclusion Criteria:

1. Anticipated hospitalization of 2 weeks or longer

2. Planned total laryngectomy

3. Current use of bupropion, nortriptyline, clonidine or nicotine replacement therapy

4. Currently receiving other forms of smoking cessation treatment

5. Severe levels of depressive symptoms, vegetative symptoms, and/or symptoms related to
psychiatric disorders that place participant at risk for harm or require immediate
treatment

6. Currently pregnant or lactating

7. Has received treatment in the TTP

8. History or/current medical condition, or any other factor that , in the judgment of
the PI would likely preclude completion of study requirements

Type of Study:

Interventional

Study Design:

Allocation: Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Outcome Measure:

Smoking Abstinence Rate

Outcome Description:

Participants will be assessed on a variety of interview, self-report, and biochemical measures at baseline, at key points during treatment (including end of treatment), and at 14-, and 26-weeks after the targeted quit date

Outcome Time Frame:

Baseline and 6 weeks (last counseling session)

Safety Issue:

No

Principal Investigator

Jan Blalock, PhD

Investigator Role:

Study Chair

Investigator Affiliation:

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Authority:

United States: Institutional Review Board

Study ID:

2009-0362

NCT ID:

NCT01098955

Start Date:

March 2010

Completion Date:

Related Keywords:

  • Head and Neck Cancer
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Cancer
  • Smoking Cessation Treatment
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
  • ACT Theory
  • Motivational and Behavioral Counseling
  • MBC
  • abstinence
  • Varenicline
  • Chantix
  • Head and Neck Neoplasms
  • Smoking

Name

Location

UT MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas  77030