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Long-Term Survival With HIV: A Study of the Psychological and Behavioral Factors Associated With the Transition From Adolescence To Young Adulthood


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HIV Infection

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Trial Information

Long-Term Survival With HIV: A Study of the Psychological and Behavioral Factors Associated With the Transition From Adolescence To Young Adulthood


Children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS are living well beyond the life expectancy that was
projected for them in the past. As the number of survivors of vertically or transfusion
associated pediatric HIV disease increases, attention to the psychosocial adjustment of
these adolescents and young adults becomes increasingly important. Studies in the late
1990s described child and adolescent survivors as generally well adjusted, though
difficulties become more apparent as the child approached the age of 18. Nothing is known
about these HIV positive youngsters as they enter late adolescence and young adulthood.
This study will examine psychosocial factors associated with long-term survival of HIV/AIDS,
including the prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses, risk behaviors, evaluation of self
competence, and the impact that multiple losses has on the adolescents' emotional
well-being. In addition, data will be collected from the primary caregivers on the
prevalence of parenting stress compared to national norms. Subjects will include children
who have been infected (either perinatally or through transfusion) for at least eight years
and who are aware of their diagnosis.

Inclusion Criteria


INCLUSION CRITERIA

HIV-infected adolescents 13-24 years of age with documented HIV infection for greater than
or equal to 13 years.

On active protocol at NIH during the past 5 years.

Willingness to sign informed consent.

Ability to understand and read English.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA

Presence of psychotic symptoms.

Cognitive impairment or full scale IQ less than or equal to 75.

Not aware of HIV diagnosis.

Type of Study:

Observational

Study Design:

N/A

Authority:

United States: Federal Government

Study ID:

010203

NCT ID:

NCT00026806

Start Date:

July 2001

Completion Date:

June 2005

Related Keywords:

  • HIV Infection
  • HIV Infection
  • Mental Health
  • Risk Behaviors
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Youth
  • HIV
  • Long Term Survivor
  • HIV Infections
  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Name

Location

National Cancer Institute (NCI)Bethesda, Maryland  20892